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Archive for the ‘Nonfiction’ Category

Interview with Author of Book on Origins of War on Drugs

June 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Elizabeth Schwartz Interview

March 28, 2017 Leave a comment

Austin novelist Jennifer Hritz and I interviewed Elizabeth Schwartz, author of BEFORE I DO: A Legal Guide to Marriage, Gay and Otherwise live on KAZI on January 22, 2017.  Here is a podcast of the interview:

before_i_do_final

Author Discusses The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools on KAZI Book Review

August 21, 2016 Leave a comment

The Monique Morris interview on her book on the criminalization of black girls in school airs Monday, August 22 at 8 s.m. CST/9 a.m. on KAZI 88.7 FM.  In her new book, PUSHOUT, Monique W. Morris, chronicles the experiences of black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Morris shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, black girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.

Dr. Morris is the Co-Founder and President of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute, and an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice. 

Coffee and Spatializing Blackness

August 8, 2016 Leave a comment

SPATIALIZING BLACKNESS: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity by  Rashad Shabazz, an associate professor in the School ofSocial  Transformation at Arizona State, will be featured on KAZI Book Review in September.

Shabazz argues that from the start of the great migration to Chicago, carceral powers literally and figuratively created a prison-like environment to contain African Americans within the so-called Black Belt on the city’s South Side.

History of Africans in Mexico on KAZI

July 30, 2016 Leave a comment

University of West Indies professor Paulette Ramsay discusses her latest book, AFRO-MEXICAN CONSTRUCTIONS OF DIASPORA, GENDER, IDENTITY, AND NATION, on the Monday, August 1 edition of KAZI Book Review at 8 a.m. CST on KAZI 88.7 FM in Austin, Texas.

In her book, Ramsay reviews the historical and cultural influence of Africans and African descended people on Mexico and the efforts to erase them from history after the end of the Mexican revolution in 1910. 

Jack London: The Fiction Writer As Social Reformer

November 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Cecelia TichiIn Cecelia Tichi’s new book Jack London: A Writer’s Fight For A Better America, she argues that London used characters and plot in his novels such as Call of the Wild and the Sea Lord not only as entertainment, but also as a way to illuminate the oppression of workers in industrial America and other unfair social conditions in the early 1900s.  London, who was the best selling author in America from 1903 to his death in 1916, mined his experiences as a laborer often working in harsh conditions to bring social reality to his popular adventure novels.  Tune in Monday at 8 a.m. CST/9 a.m. EST to KAZI Book Review for my interview.

Book Description

Jack London (1876-1916) found fame with his wolf-dog tales and sagas of the frozen North, but Cecelia Tichi challenges the long-standing view of London as merely a mass-market producer of potboilers. A onetime child laborer, London led a life of poverty in the Gilded Age before rising to worldwide acclaim for stories, novels, and essays designed to hasten the social, economic, and political advance of America. In this major reinterpretation of London’s career, Tichi examines how the beloved writer leveraged his written words as a force for the future.
Tracing the arc of London’s work from the late 1800s through the 1910s, Tichi profiles the writer’s allies and adversaries in the cities, on the factory floor, inside prison walls, and in the farmlands. Thoroughly exploring London’s importance as an artist and as a political and public figure, Tichi brings to life a man who merits recognition as one of America’s foremost public intellectuals.

Author Bio

Death of Trayvon Martin Inspires Book

October 26, 2015 Leave a comment

Stand Your GroundFor author and professor of religion, Kelly Brown Douglas, the death of Trayvon Martin was her Emmit Till moment, igniting deep chords of sadness and fear for young blacks.  With her new book, STAND YOUR GROUND: Black Bodies And The Justice Of God, she traces the history of the stand your ground culture in America  to the anglo saxon myth, and she chronicles the African American struggle to hold America accountable to its democratic ideas.

In our interview Professor Brown discussed how American founding fathers were influenced by the Anglo Saxon myth, how Black leaders like Frederick Douglas and Martin Luther King challenged America to live up to its idealism, and why Americans need to understand its racialized history.

Book Description

On the Sunday morning after the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s killer, black preachers across America addressed the questions his death raised for their communities: “Where is the justice of God? What are we to hope for?”
In this timely and compelling book, Kelly Brown Douglas examines the myths and narratives underlying a “stand-your-ground” culture, taking seriously the social as well as the theological questions raised by this and similar events, from Ferguson, Missouri to Staten Island, New York.

But the author also brings another significant interpretative lens to this text: that of a mother. She writes: “ere has been no story in the news that has troubled me more than that of Trayvon Martin’s slaying. President Obama said that if he had a son his son would look like Trayvon. I do have a son and he does look like Trayvon.”
In the face of tragedy and indifference, Kelly Brown Douglas arms the truth of a black mother’s faith in these times of “stand your ground.”

Kelly Brown Douglas

Kelly Brown Douglas

Author Bio

Kelly Brown Douglas is Professor and Director of the Religion Program at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland.  She received her Masters of Divinity and Doctorate of Philosophy from Union Theological Seminary.  She has written several books including THE BLACK CHRIST, WHAT’S FAITH GOT TO DO WITH IT?, BLACK BODIES AND THE BLACK CHURCH.