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Archive for the ‘Nonfiction’ Category

PODCAST: 2018 Interview With Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, author of THE PRICE FOR THEIR POUND OF FLESH:

September 1, 2018 Leave a comment

THE PRICE FOR THEIR POUND OF FLESH: The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation  is a groundbreaking look at how slaves were the-price-for-their-pound-of-fleshvalued, and more importantly, how they valued themselves  through every phase of life, from birth to death and beyond, in early Daina Ramey BerryAmerica.  Dr. Berry is a Professor of History and African and African American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.  I interviewed her live in the studio for the second time in August 2018, over one year after my original interview with her.  We discussed the need for a more comprehensive teaching of slavery in the schools, Kanye West’s unfortunate  statement that slavery was a choice, and the opening of the lynching museum in Alabama.

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Interview with Author of Book on Origins of War on Drugs

June 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Elizabeth Schwartz Interview

March 28, 2017 Leave a comment

Austin novelist Jennifer Hritz and I interviewed Elizabeth Schwartz, author of BEFORE I DO: A Legal Guide to Marriage, Gay and Otherwise live on KAZI on January 22, 2017.  Here is a podcast of the interview:

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Author Discusses The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools on KAZI Book Review

August 21, 2016 Leave a comment

The Monique Morris interview on her book on the criminalization of black girls in school airs Monday, August 22 at 8 s.m. CST/9 a.m. on KAZI 88.7 FM.  In her new book, PUSHOUT, Monique W. Morris, chronicles the experiences of black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. Morris shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, black girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.

Dr. Morris is the Co-Founder and President of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute, and an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice. 

Coffee and Spatializing Blackness

August 8, 2016 Leave a comment

SPATIALIZING BLACKNESS: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity by  Rashad Shabazz, an associate professor in the School ofSocial  Transformation at Arizona State, will be featured on KAZI Book Review in September.

Shabazz argues that from the start of the great migration to Chicago, carceral powers literally and figuratively created a prison-like environment to contain African Americans within the so-called Black Belt on the city’s South Side.

History of Africans in Mexico on KAZI

July 30, 2016 Leave a comment

University of West Indies professor Paulette Ramsay discusses her latest book, AFRO-MEXICAN CONSTRUCTIONS OF DIASPORA, GENDER, IDENTITY, AND NATION, on the Monday, August 1 edition of KAZI Book Review at 8 a.m. CST on KAZI 88.7 FM in Austin, Texas.

In her book, Ramsay reviews the historical and cultural influence of Africans and African descended people on Mexico and the efforts to erase them from history after the end of the Mexican revolution in 1910. 

Jack London: The Fiction Writer As Social Reformer

November 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Cecelia TichiIn Cecelia Tichi’s new book Jack London: A Writer’s Fight For A Better America, she argues that London used characters and plot in his novels such as Call of the Wild and the Sea Lord not only as entertainment, but also as a way to illuminate the oppression of workers in industrial America and other unfair social conditions in the early 1900s.  London, who was the best selling author in America from 1903 to his death in 1916, mined his experiences as a laborer often working in harsh conditions to bring social reality to his popular adventure novels.  Tune in Monday at 8 a.m. CST/9 a.m. EST to KAZI Book Review for my interview.

Book Description

Jack London (1876-1916) found fame with his wolf-dog tales and sagas of the frozen North, but Cecelia Tichi challenges the long-standing view of London as merely a mass-market producer of potboilers. A onetime child laborer, London led a life of poverty in the Gilded Age before rising to worldwide acclaim for stories, novels, and essays designed to hasten the social, economic, and political advance of America. In this major reinterpretation of London’s career, Tichi examines how the beloved writer leveraged his written words as a force for the future.
Tracing the arc of London’s work from the late 1800s through the 1910s, Tichi profiles the writer’s allies and adversaries in the cities, on the factory floor, inside prison walls, and in the farmlands. Thoroughly exploring London’s importance as an artist and as a political and public figure, Tichi brings to life a man who merits recognition as one of America’s foremost public intellectuals.

Author Bio