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Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas

May 12, 2020 Leave a comment

 

Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas is going online with events at 10 a.m. on June 13, July 11, and August 8.

Get your coffee, pastry, and orange juice and join KAZI Book Review for some riveting discussions about books and writing on the second Saturdays of June, July, and August at 10 a.m.  What are the challenges of writing and publishing the first novel, your second book or your third book? With the collection of writers on June 13, we will be discussing novels that are in the literary, crime fiction, science fiction/fantasy genres, and a short story collection. We will explore not only the themes of their most recently published books, but their unique journeys in writing and publishing them. Meng Jin, author of the novel LITTLE GODS, and Richard Santos, author of the novel TRUST ME, just published their debut novels in 2020. For Rion Amilcar-Scott, his short story collection THE WORLD DOESN’T REQUIRE YOU, published in 2019, was his second book. And for science fiction/fantasy writer Nicky Drayden, ESCAPING EXODUS, published in 2019, was her third book. This will be just the first of three events planned for the Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas. It is sponsored by KAZI Book Review and cosponsored this year by the Austin Community College Writing Department, Capital Metro, HEB, and Velva Price, District Clerk. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department. To register click here.

On July 11 we will focus on civil rights with historians Peniel Joseph, author of THE SWORD AND THE SHIELD: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.; and  Brandon Winford, author of JOHN HERVEY WHEELER, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights.

On August 8 we will feature readings of unpublished work by local authors and college students, and recognition to outstanding fiction by student authors.

The Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas is cosponsored by Austin Community College Creative Writing Department, HEB, Capital Metro, and Velva Price, District Clerk. The project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department.

Registration information will be available soon.

PODCAST: The Story of Integration at The University of Texas at Austin

June 22, 2019 Leave a comment

On December 16, 2018 I interviewed Virginia Cumberbatch, co-editor of AS WE SAW IT: The Story of Integration at The University of Texas at Austin.  Included in the interview are excerpts from an interview I previously did with retired Colonel Leon Holland in 2016, who was part of the first class of African Americans to enroll as undergraduates in 1956 at UT Austin.

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Ret. Colonel Leon Holland

 

PODCAST: 2018 Interview With Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, author of THE PRICE FOR THEIR POUND OF FLESH:

September 1, 2018 Leave a comment

THE PRICE FOR THEIR POUND OF FLESH: The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation  is a groundbreaking look at how slaves were the-price-for-their-pound-of-fleshvalued, and more importantly, how they valued themselves  through every phase of life, from birth to death and beyond, in early Daina Ramey BerryAmerica.  Dr. Berry is a Professor of History and African and African American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.  I interviewed her live in the studio for the second time in August 2018, over one year after my original interview with her.  We discussed the need for a more comprehensive teaching of slavery in the schools, Kanye West’s unfortunate  statement that slavery was a choice, and the opening of the lynching museum in Alabama.

Interview with Author of Book on Origins of War on Drugs

June 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Andrew Nagorski Talks About the NAZI Hunters

August 14, 2016 Leave a comment

After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. In Andrew Nagorski’s new book, THE NAZI HUNTERS, focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten—and who were determined to track them down to the furthest corners of the earth.

Tune in at 8 a.m. CST Monday to KAZI 88.7 FM for my interview with Andrew Nagorski.

Andrew Nagorski is an award-winning journalist and author who spent more than three decades as a foreign correspondent and editor for Newsweek.  He is also the author of  Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power. 

History of Africans in Mexico on KAZI

July 30, 2016 Leave a comment

University of West Indies professor Paulette Ramsay discusses her latest book, AFRO-MEXICAN CONSTRUCTIONS OF DIASPORA, GENDER, IDENTITY, AND NATION, on the Monday, August 1 edition of KAZI Book Review at 8 a.m. CST on KAZI 88.7 FM in Austin, Texas.

In her book, Ramsay reviews the historical and cultural influence of Africans and African descended people on Mexico and the efforts to erase them from history after the end of the Mexican revolution in 1910. 

Jack London: The Fiction Writer As Social Reformer

November 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Cecelia TichiIn Cecelia Tichi’s new book Jack London: A Writer’s Fight For A Better America, she argues that London used characters and plot in his novels such as Call of the Wild and the Sea Lord not only as entertainment, but also as a way to illuminate the oppression of workers in industrial America and other unfair social conditions in the early 1900s.  London, who was the best selling author in America from 1903 to his death in 1916, mined his experiences as a laborer often working in harsh conditions to bring social reality to his popular adventure novels.  Tune in Monday at 8 a.m. CST/9 a.m. EST to KAZI Book Review for my interview.

Book Description

Jack London (1876-1916) found fame with his wolf-dog tales and sagas of the frozen North, but Cecelia Tichi challenges the long-standing view of London as merely a mass-market producer of potboilers. A onetime child laborer, London led a life of poverty in the Gilded Age before rising to worldwide acclaim for stories, novels, and essays designed to hasten the social, economic, and political advance of America. In this major reinterpretation of London’s career, Tichi examines how the beloved writer leveraged his written words as a force for the future.
Tracing the arc of London’s work from the late 1800s through the 1910s, Tichi profiles the writer’s allies and adversaries in the cities, on the factory floor, inside prison walls, and in the farmlands. Thoroughly exploring London’s importance as an artist and as a political and public figure, Tichi brings to life a man who merits recognition as one of America’s foremost public intellectuals.

Author Bio