Archive

Author Archive

PODCAST: Interview With Jeff Abbott, Author of Inside Man

August 24, 2014 Leave a comment
Hopeton Hay, Jeff Abbott, & Intern Zoe Young

Hopeton Hay, Jeff Abbott, & Intern Zoe Young

International best selling author Jeff Abbott came on KAZI Book Review for a live interview on July 6 to discuss his new Sam Capra thriller Inside ManInside Man is the fourth Sam Capra Thriller from Abbott, a native of the Austin area and graduate of Westlake High School and  Rice University.

Interview with Annamaria Alfieri, Author of Strange Gods

August 24, 2014 Leave a comment

Strange Gods CoverAnnamaria Alfieri’s novel set in British East Africa in 1911, Strange Gods, has been described as Out of Africa meets Agatha Christie.  Learn more about this mystery novel by listening to my interview with Alfieri. 

Independence Day Weekend PODCAST: Interviews with Authors Discussing Founding Fathers

July 6, 2014 Leave a comment

Several authors have discussed the founding fathers and the events leading up to our Declaration of Independence on KAZI Book Review. John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison are among those featured in these interviews. Take a walk through the history of our nation’s founding by listening to these interviews:

Danielle Allen, Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality 

Jeff Broadwater, James Madison: A Son of Virginia and a Founder of the Nation 

John Ferling, Jefferson and Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation 

William Hogeland, Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests, and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation 

Kevin Phillips, 1775: A Good Year for Revolution 

PODCAST: Interview with Meg Gardiner, Author of Phantom Instinct

July 5, 2014 Leave a comment

Austin based thriller author Meg Gardiner was interviewed live on June 29 on KAZI Book Review by host Hopeton Hay, Sisters In Crime Heart of Texas chapter board member and writer Gale Albright, KAZI Book Review contributor Tim Chamberlain, and KAZI Book Review intern Zoe Young.  To listen to the podcast of the interview click here: 

L-R: Gale Albright, Meg Gardiner, Tim Chamberlain

L-R: Gale Albright, Meg Gardiner, Tim Chamberlain

Review of State of Infection by Michael J. Frey

June 28, 2014 Leave a comment

By Tim Chamberlain

Zombies, with a side of Civil War
Most zombie apocalypses come with pop culture references aplenty, and Michael J. Frey’s debut, State of Infection, is no different on that front. However, this trip into zombie-land comes with plausible medical explanations and a backstory that goes back to the Civil War, enough to distinguish Frey’s novel from its peers.

If you’re like me, you sometimes have trouble suspending all disbelief for a zombie novel–I always want to know how it was possible. Frey, a New York City physician, uses his medical background as inspiration and gives us a fairly reasonable explanation as to just how something like zombies (“Montoya’s encephalopathy”) might occur.

Our hero is Dr. Mike Calaf, a private practice doctor on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, that is one of relatively few survivors of the zombie outbreak in the city. The beginning of our story is a slow burn that is mostly spent in Mike’s apartment–interesting in that you tend to analyze whether you’d be doing the same as Mike in his place. However, once Mike is out of the building, the story gets to a more satisfying pace worthy of a zombie tale.
Frey’s novel veers into alternate history territory with his story of the Civil War-era origins of the present zombie situation. The backstory of Confederate intrigue that eventually causes the outbreak and the Second Civil War is not just tacked on, either–it figures fairly prominently in how everything ends up going to hell.

The fictional history is an interesting complement to the adventures of Dr. Calaf and his (of course) beautiful chance companion, the improbably-named Avalon Calendar. Avalon was a troubled youth turned successful local news reporter that was dating Calaf’s best friend before the zombies. She is, as described by Frey, nearly without flaw. Unsurprisingly, you get the feeling that Frey has merely inserted himself into the zombie apocalypse (or “ZA” as he terms it), but I’d imagine it’s hard not to put yourself at the center of your zombie fantasy. He does keep it entertaining, though.

State of Infection is a fairly quick read and is surprisingly light given the subject matter. It should be fairly satisfying for those looking for a quick zombie read this summer.

20140628-191243-69163526.jpg

Podcast: Listen to Elizabeth Crook Discuss Her Novel Monday, Monday

June 11, 2014 Leave a comment
L-R Elizabeth Crook & KAZi Book Review Intern Zoe Young

L-R Elizabeth Crook & KAZI Book Review Intern Zoe Young

Austin, Texas author Elizabeth Crook discussed her novel Monday, Monday, live on KAZI Book Review on Sunday, June 8.  In the interview Crook discussed why she used the tragic shootings that killed 17 people at The University of Texas at Austin in 1966 as the basis of her novel.

Elizabeth has written for periodicals such as Texas Monthly and the Southwestern Historical Quarterly and has served on the council of the Texas Institute of Letters. She is a member of Western Writers of America and The Texas Philosophical Society, and was selected the honored writer for 2006 Texas Writers’ Month. Her first novel, The Raven’s Bride, was the 2006 Texas Reads: One Book One Texas selection. The Night Journal was awarded the 2007 Spur award for Best Long Novel of the West and the 2007 Willa Literary Award for Historical Fiction.  To listen to the interview click here:

Podcast: Authors Discuss Insight to Langston Hughes’s Work Revealed By Letters

June 10, 2014 Leave a comment

My Dear BoyThere is much to be learned about the art of Langston Hughes from reading  letters between Hughes and his mother revealed Carmaletta Williams and John Edgar Tidwell, authors of My Dear Boy: Carrie Hughes’s Letters to Langston Hughes, 1926–1938, on the June 9 edition of KAZI Book Review on KAZI 88.7 FM.

Williams and Tidwell explained that the more than 120 heretofore unexamined letters presented in their book are a veritable treasure trove of insights into the relationship between mother Carrie and her renowned son Langston. Until now, a scholarly consensus had begun to emerge, accepting the idea of their lives and his art as simple and transparent. But as Williams and Tidwell argue, this correspondence is precisely where scholars should start in order to understand the underlying complexity in Carrie and Langston’s relationship.

Carmaletta Williams, professor of English and African American studies at Johnson County Community College, is the author of Langston Hughes in the Classroom: “Do Nothin’ till You Hear from Me” and Of Two Spirits: American Indian and African American Oral Histories. John Edgar Tidwell is a professor of English at the University of Kansas. His previous books include Montage of a Dream: The Art and Life of Langston Hughes, After Winter: The Art and Life of Sterling A. Brown, and Writings of Frank Marshall Davis: A Voice of the Black Press.

To listen to the interview click here:

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 503 other followers